September 29: 'Terror of the Scorchers' dies; Ste. Agathe fire; Uptown Lanes opens.

September 29, 2000 - Bomber receiver and 1986 CFL MVP James Murphy is inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame. For his bio, stats and awards.

September 29, 1881 - Le M├ętis, Manitoba's first French newspaper, closes after a decade. It is replaced by Le Manitoba.

September 29, 1962 - Fire starts in the Manitoba Pool Grain elevator in Ste. Agathe. By morning the elevator, 65,000 bushels of wheat and the town's train station were destroyed. Damage was estimated at $100,000. Nobody was injured.

September 29, 1960
- Uptown Academy Lanes opens as Winnipeg's largest bowling lanes. It was built in 1911 as the Uptown Theatre.


September 29, 1957 - Warren Beggs dies.

As a young police constable, Beggs was Winnipeg's first bicycle law enforcer. Nicknamed the "Terror of the Scorchers" (scorchers were cyclists that rode too fast on trails) his job was to "... round up dilatory wheel owners and other delinquents against the laws of Winnipeg regarding fast riding, traveling on sidewalks and other overt acts against the public safety".

From 1908 to 1920 Beggs was chief of the St. James police department. After retiring, the Northern Ireland native went back to work for various departments within the city and retired in 1946.

Beggs lived on Atlantic Avenue and died in King Edward Hospital at the age of 91.

For more on early cycling in Winnipeg. To read a bit of Beggs in action.

September 28: Peguis dies; 'Little Black Devil' unveiled; Churchill's railway; Memorial Park opens.

September 28, 1929 - The Hudson Bay Railway reaches the town of Churchill. The line became part of CN in 1951 and today is owned by OmniTRAX.


Henderson scores ! (CP Photo)

September 28, 1972 - The final game of the Canada - Russia Super Series is played at Moscow's Luzhniki Arena.

Winnipeg was deserted. Newspapers quote bank managers and supermarket staff saying that in the middle of the afternoon there were no customers to be seen. Eaton's television department housed 200 'shoppers' for the three hour duration.

Even schools relaxed the rules. The Free Press of September 29, 1972 mentions a memo issued by the Vincent Massey Collegiate principal to teachers:


"Subject: Staff meeting, Sept. 28, 1972, 11:30 a.m. to 2:20 p.m. in staff room.

Particulars: Study of interpersonal relationship of Canadian and Russian citizens when they are involved in a capitalistic competitive enterprise. The study will take place in the staff room with audio-visual aids supplied by the CBC."


Foster Hewitt called the game winning goal by Paul Henderson, check out these links to hear or see his call: "Here's a shot. Henderson makes a wild stab for it and falls. Here's another shot. Right in front. They score! Henderson scores for Canada !"

For more on the series: Hockey Hall of Fame or 1972 Summit Series .com. In June 2010 a Canadian bidder paid over $1m in a U.S. auction to purchase Henderson's game jersey.

September 28th, 1898 - A block-long section of Treherne's main street, from Broadway to Smith, is razed by fire. Numerous businesses are destroyed and damage was estimated to be at least $20,000. It was believed to be arson.

September 28, 1934 - Colin Inkster, the first Sheriff of Winnipeg, dies in a fire at his cabin at Delta Marsh.


St. Peters Old Stone Church

September 28, 1864 - "William King, alias Pegowys, Chief of the Red River Indians" dies at the age of 90. Chief Peguis was seen as a peacemaker and friend to the Selkirk Settlers. He is buried at St. Peter's Dynevor church in East Selkirk MB.

Memorial Fountain
September 28, 1962 - Memorial Park and the City Hydro Fountain are officially opened on the former site of the University of Manitoba.

September 28, 1869 - The Nor'Wester, Manitoba's first newspaper ceases publication. (Also see.)

Little Black Devils Memorial
September 28, 1886 - The Little Black Devil monument is unveiled on the front lawn of city hall. It is dedicated to the volunteers of the 90th Winnipeg Battalion of Rifles (now the Royal Winnipeg Rifles) who died in the 1885 Northwest Rebellion.

September 27: Clara Hughes; Randy Bachman; Wawanesa's first war dead.

September 27, 1943 - Randolph Charles (Randy) Bachmann is born in Winnipeg. His last name was shortened early in his singing career.

September 27, 1972 - Five-time Olympic medallist Clara Hughes is born in Winnipeg.

Hughes medalled in cycling in the 1996 Summer Olympics and in speed skating in the 2002 Winter Olympics making her the only Canadian to medal at both a summer and winter games. Only four athletes in history have ever achieved that feat.

September 27, 1989 - The Manitoba Glass Company site on Cemetery Road West, Beausejour, is designated a Provincial Heritage Site.

Wawanesa, Manitoba
September 27, 1916 - Gasoline engineer Arthur Austin is the first Wawanesa resident killed in World War I. He is buried at the Vimy Memorial cemetery in France and commemorated on the village's war memorial.

September 26: Isbister School; Hamitoa's first fair; U of M science building opens.

Isbister UM Archives Ill Souv of Wpg item 155b Neg ID
September 26, 1898 - The cornerstone for Isbister School on Vaughan Street is laid by Joseph Carman, Winnipeg School Board Chairman.

Downtown WInnipeg
 "The walls that you see rising before you are an expression of the universal desire of our citizens to give their children who will succeed them such a training as will enable them to carry on worthily the work of nation building which their fathers have so well begun." 
(J. Carman, September 27, 1898, Winnipeg Free Press)

Now the Winnipeg Adult Education Centre, it is the oldest surviving public school building in the city.

September 26, 1978 - Arc Industries, now Versatech Industries, is incorporated. It was started in 1962 by the parents of adults with intellectual disabilities to provide day programs and employment opportunities.


ca. 1901 (Source)


September 26, 1901 – The Duke and Duchess of York, (later George V and Queen Mary), formally open the first University of Manitoba science building on Broadway across from the Legislature. (For a photo of the celebrations.)

September 28, 1893 - The Hamiota Agricultural Society host their first Agricultural Fair at Dunsmore’s warehouse. The fair is still going strong !

September 26, 2009 - Winnipeg's Rock and Radio Reunion takes place at the convention centre. It reunited a number of bands and deejays from what many consider Winnipeg's musical 'golden era'.

September 25: CBC building opens; WAG opens; R.B. Russell dies; Wawanesa Insurance formed.

Winnipeg Art Gallery
September 25, 1971 – The Winnipeg Art Gallery is officially opened by Her Royal Highness Princess Margaret and her husband Lord Snowdon. After the ceremony it was closed again to finish construction which fell months behind due to a series of strikes. It opened to the public on January 18, 1972.

Also see Winnipeg Architecture Foundation and my Winnipeg Downtown Places post.

September 25, 1926 - Arthur Meighen's reign as Prime Minister ends when he loses a confidence motion in the House of Commons by a single vote.

September 25 1873 – The first recruitment drive for NWMP officers begins. Nine officers are hired under the command of Lt. Col Osborne Smith.

07f2_1
September 25, 1925 - Work begins at the corner of Portage and Memorial on the new Hudson Bay Company flagship store.

September 25, 1896 - The Wawanesa Mutual Insurance Company is formed in Wawanesa, Manitoba. The idea for a rural-based insurance co-op came to founders Alonzo Fowler Kempton and Charles Kerr over a jar of whiskey one evening in 1895. For more on Wawanesa Insurance Company's history. (Image: Daily Nor'Wester Oct 14, 1897).

R.B. Russell School
September 25, 1964 - Labour leader Robert Boyd “R. B.” Russell dies. During the Winnipeg General Strike he was jailed for a year at Stoney Mountain Penitentiary. R. B. Russell Vocational School is named for him.

CBC Manitoba - September 24, 1953 Free Press
September 25, 1963 - The CBC Building on Portage Avenue is officially opened and the "new" CBW radio begins broadcasting. Premier Douglas Campbell participated in the opening radio address which was carried across the entire CBC radio network.

September 24: Wpg Fire Brigade created; C. P. Walker; Harry Colebourn.

September 24, 1874 - Winnipeg's first Volunteer Fire Brigade is formed. For more on the history of firefighting in Winnipeg see Winnipeg Fire Fighters Museum. 

September 24, 1874 - William Code joins the Winnipeg Fire Department. By 1889 the Dublin-born Code was chief and earned the nickname "Fighting Billy" for his charisma and popularity. He retired in 1914 and was believed at the time to be the longest serving fireman in Canadian history. (Also see Fighting Bill Code.)

A display dedicated to Code, which includes some of his personal artifacts, can be seen at the Winnipeg Fire Museum. 

September 24, 1932 - Premier John Bracken appoints a Royal Commission to investigate how things went so wrong in the Machray Affair. (See the Sept. 22 entry or this Manitoba Historical Society essay.)

September 24, 1942 - Corliss Powers ("C.P.") Walker dies in Winnipeg. He and wife Harriet came to Winnipeg from the U.S. in 1897 to add a local theatre to their mid-western U.S. chain. They eventually built The Walker Theatre, the jewel of their entertainment circuit.

Walker is buried in Winnipeg's Brookside Cemetery.

September 24, 1962 - Actress Nia Vardalos is born Antonia Eugenia Vardalos in Winnipeg.

Winnie the bear
September 24, 1947 - Major Harry Colebourn dies in Winnipeg.

While en route to Europe in August 1914, the Canadian Army Veterinary Corps member purchased an orphaned black female bear cub at White River, ON and named her Winnie after his hometown of Winnipeg. Winnie was left at the London Zoo for safekeeping when they deployed to mainland Europe. After the war he donated Winnie to the zoo where she had become a major attraction.

Harry Colebourn Grave
Colebourn returned to Winnipeg where he started a private veterinary practice on McMillan Avenue. He also worked for the animal section of the Canadian Department of Agriculture. He is buried in Winnipeg's Brookside Cemetery. 

September 24, 1955 - Joseph Lamont dies in Winnipeg. Born and raised in Treherne, Lamont was a surgeon who served in both World Wars. He was also for a time the provincial coroner and the district medical officer for the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

September 24, 1941 - 9 RCACS (Air Cadet Squadron) is formed in Neepawa.

September 23: Dancer Paddy Stone; MLA Joe Borowski.

September 23, 1986 - Dancer and choreographer Paddy Stone dies in Winnipeg.
Three's Company, Stone (bottom)

Born on September 16, 1924 in Winnipeg, Stone began his career with the RWB.
In the 1950s he was acclaimed for his performances on the London stage, including in Annie Get Your Gun. In 1953 he teamed up with Irving Davies and Beryl Kaye to form a dance group called Three’s Company that was soon “touring to acclaim in Paris, Rome, London, Chicago and New York.By the mid 50s the trio settled in New York.

Stone appeared twice on the Ed Sullivan show in 1955, was in a Broadway play and appeared as a dancer in films such as Gene Kelly’s Invitation to the Dance (released in 1956). In 1982 he was choreographer for the film Victor/Victoria. (His filmography).

Stone returned to his roots as a choreographer with the RWB in the early 80’s. He died on September 23rd 1986.

September 23, 1996Joe Borowski, MLA and Cabinet Minister for Thompson, dies. He resigned in 1971 over the issue of legalizing abortion and spent the next twenty years in the national spotlight fighting on behalf of the pro-life movement.

September 22: Machray pleads guilty; Aikins is LG; Inkster's boulevard.

September 22, 1932 - Lawyer John Machray pleads guilty on the first day of his embezzlement trial.

Machray was one of Manitoba’s most prominent citizens. He was a senior partner in the law firm Machray and Sharpe, chair of the U of M Board of Governors, bursar of the U of M, and Chancellor of St. John’s College. He handled the trust funds for a number of wealthy clients and institutions such as the University of Manitoba and the Anglican Church.  

In a series of bad investment deals uncovered after the stock market crash of 1929, he is believed to have lost over $800,000 of the U of M's money, leaving it broke, and $1 million from the church, (about $30 million in today's dollars.)

There was no money to be recovered and Machray was sentenced the following day to seven years in Stony Mountain. He died of cancer the following year.

For more on the Machray Scandal see: Manitoba Historical Society essay and this Manitoban article.

September 22, 1987
- The Pembina Trail Library opens on Pembina Highway.


September 22, 1945 - The University Women's Club of Winnipeg kick off their 1945 speaking season with English author and lecturer Hilda Beal who was on a six week visit to North American visit.

September 22, 1882 – Former federal cabinet minister James Cox Aikins becomes the fourth Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba, serving for four years.

September 22, 1913 - City council passes a bylaw to name Inkster Boulevard after Colin Inkster. (For more on Inkster and the street.)

September 21: You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet; Shanghai Restaurant opens; Leaf Rapids a town; Doer is premier.

September 21, 1974 - BTO release the single "You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet."

The song was recorded by Randy as a joke for his brother Gary - the stutter in the lyrics mimicked the stutter Gary had when he was young. When another song was dropped from the album, record execs wanted "You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet" to replace it. Bachman tried to record the song without the stutter, but it wouldn't work so the original version was used.


Bachman was said to have been embarrassed when it started getting airplay and initially refused to allow it to be released as a single. He eventually gave in and the song became their only U.S. number one hit.

For a vintage video of the song, (warning: you'll be humming it for the rest of the day !) Also, see this Billboard article on YASNY and Randy Bachman's Official Web Site.

September 21, 1976
- The Local Government District of Leaf Rapids becomes the Town of Leaf Rapids. it was built in 1971 to serve the Ruttan Mine which closed in 2002.

September 21, 1951 - The Pinawa Generating Station is retired to allow for a stronger water flow at the upgraded Seven Sisters Generating Station.

Link
September 21, 1999 - Gary Doer is elected Premier of Manitoba ending Gary Filmon’s eleven year reign. First elected as an MLA in 1986, he stepped down in 2009 and was appointed Canadian Ambassador to the United States of America.


September 21, 1995 - The 'Toonie' becomes part of Canada’s currency. See this CBC News report.


Shanghai'd
September 21, 1935 - The Shanghai Chop Suey House opens at 224 King Street. In 1941 it moved to the Coronation Block. The restaurant closed on January 9, 2011 and the building demolished in 2012.

September 21, 1946 - Three people are killed in a train wreck outside Carberry, Manitoba.

September 20: Phil Fontaine born; Minnedosa's railway; James Ross dies.

Minnedosa
September 20th, 1883 - Minnedosa passes a bylaw to issue $20k in debentures to purchase land for the track, right of way and necessary service buildings for the Manitoba and North Western Rail Road Company.

Also see: Manitoba and Northwest Railway and Early Minnedosa: The Crossing, the Town and the Railway.

September 20, 1871 - James Ross dies. He served in a number of important roles in Red River’s early history. At times he was co-owner and editor of the Nor’Wester, Manitoba's first newspaper, sheriff, postmaster and Governor of the Gaol. He also served as chief justice in Louis Riel’s provisional government of 1870.

September 20, 1944 - Phil Fontaine is born on the Sagkeeng First Nation. He was elected Grand Chief of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs in 1989, 1991 and 1994 and served as Grand Chief of the Assembly of First Nations from 1997 - 2000.

September 19: Farewell streetcars; Sifton dies; Catherine Wisnicki, architect.

Kolley (September 19, 1955, Winnipeg Free Press)

September 19, 1955 - After 64 years Winnipeg's streetcar era comes to an end. Just before 3 a.m. operator Leonard Kolley pulled car number 734 into the North Main garage. Despite the early hour, people waited along the route to be part of the final ride.


The following day trolleys and diesel buses took over the routes and Mayor Shapre participated in a ceremonial taking up of the track. The streetcars were sold as scrap, many ending up as cottages or chicken coops.

For more on Winnipeg's streetcar history see Winnipeg Streetcar and CBC Archives.

September 19, 2003 – Brandon University’s Health Studies Complex opens.

September 19, 1919
- Catherine Mary Wisnicki is born in Winnipeg. She became the first woman to graduate from McGill’s School of Architecture in 1943 and went on to a distinguished career in her field.

September 19, 1851
- Reverend John Black, the West’s first Presbyterian minister, arrives in Kildonan. John Black Memorial Church on Henderson Highway is named for him.

September 19, 1912 - John W. Sifton, politician and president of the Winnipeg Free Press from 1902 - 1912, dies.


February 15, 1945, Winnipeg Tribune

 September 19, 1928 - Speed skater Betty Mitchell is born. 

A Glenlawn Collegiate grad, class of 1945, she broke a couple of international records when she while still competing as a junior and took the overall North American Senior Women’s Championship in 1947, 1948 and 1950. Unfortunately, World War II kept her from international events in her prime but she was Canada's only entry in the world championships in Norway in February 1949, (women's speed skating was not yet an Olympic sport). Olson finished 12th of 20 competitors.

September 19: Farewell streetcars; Sifton dies; Catherine Wisnicki, architect.

Kolley (September 19, 1955, Winnipeg Free Press)

September 19, 1955 - After 64 years Winnipeg's streetcar era comes to an end. Just before 3 a.m. operator Leonard Kolley pulled car number 734 into the North Main garage. Despite the early hour, people waited along the route to be part of the final ride.


The following day trolleys and diesel buses took over the routes and Mayor Shapre participated in a ceremonial taking up of the track. The streetcars were sold as scrap, many ending up as cottages or chicken coops.

For more on Winnipeg's streetcar history see Winnipeg Streetcar and CBC Archives.

September 19, 2003 – Brandon University’s Health Studies Complex opens.

September 19, 1919
- Catherine Mary Wisnicki is born in Winnipeg. She became the first woman to graduate from McGill’s School of Architecture in 1943 and went on to a distinguished career in her field.

September 19, 1851
- Reverend John Black, the West’s first Presbyterian minister, arrives in Kildonan. John Black Memorial Church on Henderson Highway is named for him.

September 19, 1912 - John W. Sifton, politician and president of the Winnipeg Free Press from 1902 - 1912, dies.


February 15, 1945, Winnipeg Tribune

 September 19, 1928 - Speed skater Betty Mitchell is born. 

A Glenlawn Collegiate grad, class of 1945, she broke a couple of international records when she while still competing as a junior and took the overall North American Senior Women’s Championship in 1947, 1948 and 1950. Unfortunately, World War II kept her from international events in her prime but she was Canada's only entry in the world championships in Norway in February 1949, (women's speed skating was not yet an Olympic sport). Olson finished 12th of 20 competitors.

September 18: E Cora Hind; Terry Fox an OC; Farewell, Mr. Dressup.

September 18, 2001 – 'Mr. Dressup', Ernie Coombs, dies of a stroke at age 73. Generations of Canadian children watched his television show that ran from 1967 to 1996.

In 1998 Coombs spoke at the University of Manitoba's Festival of Life and Learning. For CBC coverage of his passing.
To watch the show's opening sequence !



Streetcar 356
September 18 - 19, 1955 – it's the final day for streetcar service in Winnipeg. People line the streets to watch the final cars run. (For more, see tomorrow's entry as the last car pulled into the garage at 3 a.m. !)

September 18, 1980 - Winnipeg-born Terry Fox becomes the youngest Companion of the Order of Canada, the highest level of the award. Due to Fox’s ailing health Governor General Ed Schreyer flies to Port Coquitlam B.C. to present the award.

For CBC news coverage of the presentation.

September 18, 1931 - John Arbuthnot dies in Victoria, B.C. He was a Winnipeg businessman, involved in the lumber industry, and Mayor of Winnipeg from 1901 - 1903.

September 18, 1861 - E. Cora Hind is born in Toronto.

Hind came to Manitoba in 1882 to practice journalism, becoming the Winnipeg correspondent for many eastern newspapers and Maclean's magazine. In 1901 she was hired by the Manitoba Free Press eventually specializing in agriculture. Her crop reports and estimates were read around North America. In 1906 Hind was appointed the Free Press' Commercial Editor.

Hind was also a driving force in the temperance and suffragette movement.


"
There is much more interest taken in breeding hogs in Western Canada than there is in breeding children". (E. Cora Hind)

September 17: Portage Place Mall opens; Birtle's Eye-Witness; Clarendon Hotel's temporary reprieve.

Portage Place
September 17, 1987 - Portage Place Mall opens.

September 17, 1994 - Blue Bomber Blaise Bryant nets 249-rushing-yards at Ivor Wynne Stadium setting a new club record. The record stood until August 2009 when it was broken by Fred Reid.

September 17, 1891 - The Birtle Eye-Witness is founded. The original publisher, Edmund James Wilson, remained at the helm until 1943. In January 2001 a number of rural papers: The Birtle Eye-Witness; Hamiota Echo; Rossburn Review and Shoal Lake Star were merged to form Crossroads This Week.


Former Clarendon Hotel
September 17, 2010 - The long-vacant Clarendon Hotel reopens as the MTS Exhibition Centre. It has since been demolished.

September 17, 1962 - Scott Arniel is born in Kingston, ON. Drafted by the Winnipeg Jets in 1981, he played for six seasons with the team. He returned to the city a decade later to play, then coach, the Manitoba Moose. He was named AHL coach of the year at the end of the 2008 -2009 season.

September 16: City clock unveiled; Bisons open University Stadium; Pope at Bird's Hill; Alfred Boyd, first "premier".

Winnipeg City Hall
September 16, 1974 - Winnipeg's city hall clock is unveiled. It was a centennial birthday gift to Winnipeg from the Molson Group of Companies, which included Molson Brewery, Beaver Lumber and Willson's Stationers.

September 16 1870 - Winnipeg businessman Alfred Boyd (1836-1908) becomes Manitoba's first 'premier'. The title was actually "Provincial Secretary in the Executive Council and Chief Minister". It would be another four years before the Chief Minister became part of the government, thus making them a Premier.

Boyd Street in Winnipeg is named for him.

September 16, 2006 - The final ex-WREN reunion dinner is held in Winnipeg. The Women's Royal Navy Service (WRNS) was created in 1942 and disbanded in 1946.

September 16, 1914 - The Canadian Aviation Corps, forerunner to the RCAF, is created under the command of Sir Sam Hughes.

University Stadium
September 16, 1967 - The University of Manitoba Bisons play their first regular season football game at University Stadium. They beat the UBC Thunderbirds 9 - 0.

September 16, 1935
- Streetcar service to Charleswood ends. It is replaced by bus service.


September 16, 1984 - Pope John Paul II celebrates mass in front of 150,000 people at Bird’s Hill Park. His homily included the following:

"Manitoba itself truly reflects a variety of many different cultures. Besides its population of British origin and French origin - in addition to native peoples - so many other Western countries are represented here….

The historical experience of the two founding peoples of Canada who bound themselves to live in mutual respect for the unique cultural identity of each other has providentially created that atmosphere of respect for cultural diversity which characterizes Canada today. In her own multicultural interaction, Canada not only offers to the world a creative vision of society but she also has a splendid opportunity to show consistency between what she believes and what she does."